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Wednesday, 21 November 2018

Behind the headlines - a story I don't think I have told before

Thank you to everyone for yesterday's comments, they were very much appreciated.

Eunice summed it up perfectly: "a sad pathetic scrap".  When we first met Daisy she was a walking skeleton, scared and thoroughly miserable.  But despite whatever trauma she'd been through a spark of intelligence and kindness shone through and you know the rest.

But what you might not know is a couple of things which happened when we went to Animal Care in Lancaster to meet her.   I had found Daisy on their website and the text which accompanied her listing was heart-breaking:




M. and I had decided we would look for a Collie-cross type dog, which is how Madam was described.  After completing the 'formalities' at reception, Animal Care suggested we take her for a walk around their land, so we went to put on boots and coats, and they went to get her from the kennel.  When "Macey" was brought out of her concrete prison to meet us we were the other side of the car park and, to my shame, I know the first words I uttered were "oh crap, that's not what we came for" as we were greeted with the sight of something clearly not a collie-cross, and clearly part-lurcher/greyhound/whippet.

But she was so delighted to be out on a lead and very pleased to see us/anyone who'd give her attention (and we'd driven 80 miles for this), that it would have been stupid NOT to take her for the promised walk.  "Macey" walked very nicely on her lead, did all her toilet, and we met a young family who were also getting to know their potential dog.  At this point it could all have gone horribly wrong - in the space of about half a second a toddler sprinted towards the completely unknown dog at the other end of my lead and flung her arms around it's neck.  Neither the parents or I could have moved fast enough to stop it and with the wrong dog the consequences could have been awful.  Little Miss Perfect, however, snuffled the little girl, wagged her tail and accepted every stroke and pat that was available.  Phew.  But that told us a lot about this dog's character.  (To this day she still adores small children and wants to stick her head into prams and pushchairs).


Back at the office we agreed with the staff that "the walk" had been successful but I wanted to know what this dog might be like to live with indoors, rationalising that we spend more time quietly in the house with our pet than we do out on excursions.   We went off to their staff room and tried to spend some quiet time with this skinny little girl.


She would not settle with us.  I tried to sit on the sofa with her - she scratched at the door to be let out.  I sat on the floor with her, she pawed at me and would not be still.  To be honest it was getting a bit annoying, and then Daisy saw her lead on a chair, picked it up and basically "threw' it at me.  "Yes, yes, very clever dear, now settle down".   But she would not, and did it again.  We joked "this dog is telling us she wants to go for another walk".

"OK, but then we're going home  Right?"

So we put her lead on, went back outside, and the very moment we reached some grass Daisy went to the loo again.  And a big pile of poop is what got Daisy her forever home . . . because here we have a starved, traumatised, miserable little wretch, and despite whatever she's been through, she knows that she should do her toilet outside and would try anything available to her to tell us she needed to go out.

So we went for a coffee at the Centre's little cafe and said "what do we do"?   And my answer was "we have to give her a home".

Because she was a kind and gentle girl, she clearly had a wonderful and good soul, and she deserved a home like ours.  No, she wasn't what we "thought" we wanted, but I remember saying to Management "she might not be what we came for but I cannot leave without her ".




And two days later I was able to take her away from concrete prison to a life of interesting walks, comfy sofas and fleecy quilts.  Welcome home Daisy. xx





(c) J. Rowland, 2013




20 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thanks Marlene. I could not bear to think about what might happen to this gentle little girl if we did not step in . . .

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  2. Another post which has given me a lump in my throat. In spite of whatever traumas she went through before being rescued Daisy clearly was, and is, a very intelligent dog. No matter what you 'thought' you wanted I don't think you could have walked away without her - and she's obviously fallen on her paws by becoming part of your little family. I love the photos, especially the one in the bluebells :) I just wish I lived nearer to you as I'd love to meet Daisy - and you and 'M' too of course :)

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    1. Sorry Eunice! Yes, Daisy is frighteningly smart - when it suits her. It would be lovely to meet up and you're not actually that far from us. Perhaps in Spring (let's have more light and warmth) we could arrange a day to meet halfway?

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    2. That sounds like a plan, we'll have to sort something out next year :)

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    3. I had a look at a map - if we meet in the Tebay/Kendal area that's half way between Bag End and the Mouse House. But yes, next year when we have a few more hours daylight :)

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  3. What a beautiful dog! It was meant to be - I love a happy ending.

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    1. Thank you for taking the time time comment, and welcome to Bag End :)

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  4. I was right then, Daisy chose you, yes she definitely did. I would have fallen for her too being a fan of greyhounds, lurchers and whippets. What a darling girl she is, she's blossomed in your care. She's beautiful.

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    1. You’re right Eileen, she clearly pegged us as complete suckers and then did everything in her power to reel us in!

      I knew nothing about whippets and sight-hounds before Daisy, but now I am hooked. They are such gentle, clever, wonderful people :) Please give Annie a cuddle from me.

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  5. It's funny how things work out. It was obviously meant to be. Daisy is gorgeous and clearly a well loved girl. X

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  6. I know you told me some of the story, but hearing it all, I can believe why you couldn't leave without her. I wouldn't have been able to either. Thanks for sharing & I love the photos of her in the bluebells & the last one with such a beautiful reflection of the two of you in your pond. Take care.

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    1. Gosh Susan, you are clever remembering her story :). I love that pond picture, my friend Jill took it one afternoon when she was visiting and it’s fabulous - just wish my gardening jeans weren’t quite so filthy!

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  7. Replies
    1. Thanks Sue. Daisy would probably agree with you if she were not still buried deep in the back of her bedtime crate, that's the one with a memory foam mattress, multiple fleece covers and it's own electric blanket on a timer . . .

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  8. In tears now. Thank goodness you all found each other. When the Nu decided to move in with me I wasn't sure as tortoiseshells had never been my thing. I wasn't sure if she was a stray as although she looked in good condition she was thin and covered in fleas and riddled with tape worm - oh joy. After several weeks of searching to try and find an owner I accepted the inevitable and nine years later she rules the house with a paw of iron.

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    1. Ooops, sorry. Really did not mean to make you cry :) Clearly Nu is as smart as Daisy, quickly sussed that you were going to be a wonderful Mum and worked her way into your heart (and probably into your soft blankets, most comfortable chair and probably your bed too!)

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    2. That and the word 'Mug' tattooed across my forehead lol. At last count she has 3 separate beds scattered around the house, numerous blankets and a set of steps that my husband built to enable her to get on our bed as she's recently started to find it difficult to jump. We are grateful for her gracious and benevolent rule. :-))

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    3. Oh, it's a good job I wasn't eating when I read this or I'd have been snorting food over the keyboard!! We installed a permanent ramp in the house when Ollie found the step down into the sitting room too much so your new build is perfectly reasonable . . .

      Talking of "cat steps", don't know if you read "Two Little Square Black Dogs" but she has the best ramp you could wish for. Originally made for one of her pups, also used and abused by the Feline Overlords.
      http://twosquaredogs.blogspot.com/2018/09/scottie-ramp.html

      Are you OK? I see you're not blogging anymore . . .

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