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Thursday, 25 October 2018

After much cogitation

The lawn at the far side of the Big Pond has been a problem ever since we created it.  A deliberate decision was made not to put a drain from the pond to take surplus water and I am still happy with that choice, but it does mean that this bit of ground can be fairly damp much of the time.



It is on a slight slope, despite much work to try and level it off, a right b*gger to mow, and no-one uses it for anything.  I've threatened on many occasions to "do something with it" and finally that time has come.



Rightly or wrongly, we've decided to do away with the grass, and make the area a huge bed, with as many trees in as I can reasonably get away with - Management has put in a Special Request for an oak tree . . .   On the upside there will no longer be a requirement for weekly mowing, or the constant battle with edging to stop the grass growing into the pond margin.  Covered in bark chip, and with a distinct likelihood of a log pile or two we should create a more diverse environment for frogs, newts and anything else which wants to live in this part of the garden, and with time some extra dappled shade will be a great place for hostas, hydrangea and the like.  Of course, I might just try to turn it all into a giant Gunnera bog . . .

Logan Botanic Garden:



On the downside there will be a bit of weeding, and additional trees will put extra leaves into the pond each Autumn, but we've decided that there will be a net reduction in the amount of work, and probably a big gain horticulturally.



So the grass had a final to-within-an-inch-of-its-death cut, logs that were not doing a very good job of making an edge were moved, and barriers were erected to keep Daisy away.



Then came the glyphosate.  I hate doing it but we used a watering can to be certain of no spray being blown into the pond.   In another couple of weeks our tree surgeon is coming to take down four silver birch which, sadly, have reached the end of their useful life here and we will cover the lawn with as thick a layer of chippings as possible.  And then ask Simon to bring another couple of truck loads when he has them.  Should be ready for planting next Spring . . .






8 comments:

  1. That sounds like a good plan especially as there will be less work for you to do eventually. More trees and a home for frogs sounds great.

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    1. Thanks Eileen, a garden this big will always be a lot of work, but I am trying to deal with bits and pieces that we haven't really got right, and are a pain to look after.

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  2. Good idea and I'm trying to remember how much lawn was out the back & if Daisy will still have plenty of room to run around(giggle). Your selection of trees sounds great and should look lovely in years to come. Have a great weekend & take care.

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    1. Susan, I don't think you need to worry about Daisy running out of space! Thanks (as always) for commenting.

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  3. Maybe some of your red squirrels will move in eventually.

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    1. It's a nice thought Sue, but we have had no red squirrels here since that *@£$&%! cut down the trees which held their dreys. A neighbour (about 100 yards away) has seen one but it's not made it down here.

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  4. Biodiversity and habitat enhancements always beat lawns in my book. Can't wait to see what it looks like when you get planting.:-)

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    1. Oh lovely, it all sounds so much better the way you say it - thanks K, I shall be borrowing biodiversity and habitat enhancements for a future post!

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