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Friday, 27 April 2018

Road trip, part two - Logan Botanic Garden

Carrying on from part one of my first Road Trip with Bill.

Some people want to visit shops when they are on holiday (shudder), some want to go round old houses, some want to lie on a beach and drink boozy cocktails supplied by a loin-cloth-clad cabana boy (go on, say that fast, three times, after some of those cocktails!!)  I've realised what I like best is visiting gardens.

Many years ago Management and I were on holiday in Torridon and I did not take the opportunity to visit Inverewe, which I've regretted it ever since, but thanks to having the van am now making plans to remedy that oversight.  Closer to home but benefiting from the same shelter are the Botanic Gardens at Logan.  Given how cold the last couple of months have been I was really too early to see many of the collections at their best but it did not matter one iota.  The entire site is complete nirvana - the Gunnera Bog, the tree ferns, Woolemia Nobilis, massive glasshouse.  I visited on a misty Thursday and again on Friday when it was clear and bright, and I will be visitin g again - have signed up for Friend membership and I'm sure I'll get good value out of it.


If you thought there were too many pictures in part one there is no point me apologising for part two ... if you're not a gardener just look away now.


Magnolia campbellii 'Charles Raffill'
Blooms the size of dinner plates, not a speck of frost damage.  I would have paid a great deal to have the option of going up in a cherry picker to get an eye-level look at those flowers.   (The one I did get close to was on another, much smaller, tree)











The massive gunnera bogs felt like a prehistoric pit of quietly sleeping dinosaurs waiting to wake up.  Some of the huge rhizomes were as big as a man's body.













Cyathea medullaris





When I win the Lottery you'll know where I've gone to hide because there will be a greenhouse rather like this one!  It was like stepping into an bumblebee apiary (if there was such a thing).  The bees were calm, well fed and warm - and astonishingly noisy :)



















I have never 'got' the tree fern craze - why would you spend hundreds of pounds on a fragile plant that never evolved to survive in our climate?  Sitting on a bench in a grove of massive Dicksonia antarctica I had an epiphany of understanding.  I'll never try to grow them at Bag End, but to see them planted with gum trees, as they would grow naturally in places like Tasmania - fantastic!  A viewing platform allows you to see down onto some of them, which is an unusual and lovely view.





















Wollemia nobilis
I've never seen this in the flesh before, got all excited and emotional.











There is more to the garden, much, much more, but these are just the sections that caught most of my attention on this visit.  It's quite likely that next time I go to the garden I will be focussed on something completely different.













12 comments:

  1. I'm not a gardener but I always enjoy your photos and many of these are exceptional. I love the shot with the pond and those magnolias are gorgeous : I've often wondered why 'magnolia' paint is always a horrible creamy-yellowy colour when the actual flowers are nothing of the sort!

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    1. Aww, blush :). Thank you Eunice. You’re such an excellent photographer so your compliment means a great deal.

      I know what you mean about magnolia paint, these blooms were an exceptional colour.

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  2. Not a gardener myself but your photos are wonderful and thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks Eileen. Glad you enjoyed your 'visit by photo' :)

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  3. Lovely post, it’s nice to see a garden before all the blooms, I adore trees, we always get trips to the New Forest, which is local to us. Glad you had such a good trip.

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    1. Hi Marlene, I hope you do better with the New Forest than I ever used to. When we lived in Hampshire I regularly visited a friend in Lymington and whilst it wasn't far in terms of miles, I always got stuck in traffic and the journey took ages.

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  4. I am a gardener (though not as good as you), & I loved the photos. If you really want a tree fern experience, you must come to Australia & we live near some of those forests of ferns & gums. I definitely don't like them in home gardens, as they really belong in the bush, where they come into their own. OMG, a Wollemi Pine all the way over in Scotland. I know exactly where they come from too & have been up through the valley where they found them. I can't believe you seeing all this in Scotland. How wonderful. Take care. PS, I think I had a photo of the tree ferns on a Scavenger Hunt post.

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    1. Well Susan, if I ever get to Oz I will have you take me to some of these forests of ferns & gums because I was quite enthralled by them.

      Lucky you having been to the place where the Wollemia was discovered.

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  5. What a wonderful collection of photographs, I did enjoy looking at them.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Hi Jan, so glad you enjoyed the pictures, and thank you for taking the time to leave a comment :)

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  6. My friend Sally and I were just discussing today how much fun it is to go off on an adventure by yourself. Good on you. I'm off myself this coming Wednesday.

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    1. Oh an adventure - they are always fun! Are you going birding?

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