Sunday, 10 February 2019

A do nothing day

My  plan  [that four-letter word again] intention for today was tidy up the Coppice.  But this morning muscles were too tired  - yesterday I reckon I moved over 60 buckets of bark chip and despite the sun trying to come out it was too cold to want to be in the most shady part of the garden.  So an "indoors day" was called for.

Management's "plans" went awry too - half way through a walk with Daisy she suddenly wasn't there.    He was on a nearby lonning with a couple of forks in the path, so spent sometime racing up and down each one trying to find her.  By which time she had raced home, sprinted round the garden to try to get in the house and I caught sight of her as she ran past my study.  I found her on the balcony, trembling and very worried.

Management came home and we worked out what had probably happened:  she "lost" him and had the sense to get herself home.  This has happened before, but not so far from home, and as a result we always leave our gate open when we're out with her so she can get back into the garden.  A very worried Little Girl then paced around the house trying to settle before throwing up spectacularly on the kitchen rug.  Stress vomit - full of bile, yuk.  She calmed down a lot after that.  ðŸ™ƒ


For some time now it has been obvious that our Darling Girl is now A.Very.Old.Dog who's nearly completely deaf and has failing cognitive abilities.  I'll not jump in and say "doggy dementia" because she does not fit that diagnosis.  However, she is (in human terms) at least as old as M's Mum who does not have dementia but is very, very forgetful.  And that is where we think Daisy is.  She will often wander around the house looking into each room to check where we are;  she has definitely got much, much worse in the car, and I have noticed her anxiety levels in bad weather have increased.  That's OK, we have the time and {hopefully} the intelligence to adapt to meet her needs now and in the future.

A couple of hours later she had relaxed enough to feel able to take herself outside and sit on the balcony for a little while.



Which is roughly what the rest of the household did, although not on the balcony.  M. read a new book and I messed with a jigsaw puzzle.   Apart from regular conversations and cuddles with Daisy we have done very little today.


13 comments:

  1. Awww, poor Daisy, losing M and getting herself so worried that she made herself ill, though at least she had the sense to come home. I hope she's been okay since she settled down. It's awful when they get old and not quite 'right' and there's not a damn thing you can do about it - they just don't stay with us for long enough do they? :(

    I did my 'good deed for the day' today regarding a little dog, though the circumstances seemed a little odd - I may post about it on my blog later in the week, right now I'm editing the photos I took at the museum this afternoon for my next post.

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  2. I think M. was as worried as Daisy - obviously because she'd gone missing and also because he knew I'd half kill him if anything happened to her!

    Second half of your comment is ominous, I do hope it has a happy ending. If it's going to upset me and play on my mind for months, please warn me and I'll skip that post on your blog . . .

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    1. No, it's nothing that will upset you, it just involved someone in a shop and that particular shop's 'rule' which, in the circumstances, I found a bit odd. Actually I might post about it later today and leave the museum for the end of the week as it's taking me longer to edit the photos than I thought it would.

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  3. Poor Daisy and the worry M would have felt at losing her and your worrying so much about her declining health. Jayne I know what you're going through believe me. I wish I could give darling Daisy a great big hug.

    I must tell you this story. When I was a girl we used to return to Manchester quite regularly to visit my grandmother, a seventy five mile car journey. We had a Welsh terrier at the time, I was walking with her with my Dad when someone let off a firework, a loud bang and our dog bolted. We searched frantically for her and I returned to my grandmother's home heartbroken knowing our dog was out there somewhere alone and lost. Do you know, our little dog was standing outside my gran's house waiting for us, she'd crossed such a busy main road to get there and how she knew the route is a mystery. I can remember the relief and joy at seeing her back safe though.

    Daisy couldn't want for a better home with you, oh bless you all.

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    1. Thanks Eileen. Previously when Daisy has "taken herself home" she's only been a couple of hundred yards away, and it is usually because M. has bumped into someone and is chatting, and she's bored. This time they were further away, but thankfully it is quiet and she wasn't ever near traffic.

      How frightening for you as a child, but what a clever chap to get herself to your grandmother's.

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  4. Just catching up on 2 posts. No wonder you were knackered after moving 60 tubs of bark chip & glad you had a quiet day. Poor Daisy!! Hope she is OK now & can settle back down. Not much happened here today after I'd done a load of washing, vacuumed & fed the birds. Made some binding, K went to Woodies (woodworking club), then we went for a walk, even though it was cooler today, it was very, very muggy. Have a great week & take care.

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    1. Thanks Susan. She seemed to settle after a couple of hours but didn't eat much all day, probably the shock. Sounds like you were busy, with all those things we have to get done which are never acknowledged until they are NOT done :-(

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  5. Those "outings" are stressful all the way around, for people and pets. Glad she got home safely. It's sad when our pets get older so we just love 'em more for it.

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    1. Thanks m'dear, in a way it is reassuring to know that she really does know her way home.

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  6. When our previous old girl began to forget herself and her eyesight was a little on the hazy side and her ears full of cotton wool - she was still a happy old thing, pottering around with a slow wag. Difficulties occurred when she became more rickety and deaf/shortsighted, walks were less enjoyable as she would 'lose' us and fret. In the end we would have to keep her on an extended lead and this very physical 'connection' seemed to make her feel safer. Hugs for Daisy and you two too xx

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    1. Spot on Kate, elderly does not necessarily mean unhappy, not when you have doting Staff on hand. I generally have Daisy on a flexi-lead, she is definitely happier with that umbilical. xx

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  7. Should part of the adapting be, to keep her on a leash?

    💛

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