Saturday, 10 February 2018

Hidden History

Mentioning the Mawbray Arrows on yesterday's blog made me realise there are a couple of other historical gems near the dunes, and although I have photos, they never made it to the blog before now.

Our route to yesterday's walk takes you along the B3500, known to everyone here as "the coast road".  About half-way between Maryport and Allonby is Milefortlet 21. This is just one of the series of forts built by the Romans every mile between Ravenglass and Newcastle, although for the last 84 miles (from Bowness on Solway) the forts run cross-country instead of up the coast.  You will know that stretch as Hadrian's Wall 😊

We normally drive straight past, parking is very limited* and the walk is extremely short, but one day last summer we did stop.



As with so many sites like this, there is not a huge amount to see, but enough that if you use your imagination you can spend a few minutes wondering what it might have been like for Roman soldiers at the edge of the empire.







Looking in the other direction and peeping over a bramble-filled hedge, more history but this time far more recent.







*  Thanks to Google Maps, this satellite picture shows both the fort and the remaining salt pan.  Parking is available for about 3 or 4 cars at Crosscanonby Nature Reserve.  The apparent parking on the beach side of the road is no longer there.  Recent storms have eroded the land and whilst you can get a car off the road I wouldn't recommend it.



Unfortunately the salt pan won't last much longer - local men remember when there was so much land between the beach and the road there were two football pitches just down the road from here.  As the photo shows, that is definitely no longer the case.







10 comments:

  1. Lovely sunny photos, the last two in particular make me want to pack up the van and the dogs and go camping by the sea :)

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    1. Normally I would say go for it, but given your current physical state and the wind & rain lashing down outside, I think your best bet is to stay put!

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    2. I wouldn't go unless it was sunny like your photos! :)

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  2. Interesting piece of history. Are you having any issues with Blogger? It's behaving quite strange for me at the moment. Take care.

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    1. The last ten days or so Firefox and Blogger have been having "issues". I'm now using Safari and everything is good again (Safari is the Mac browser, don't think it will work for you). When things go strange, first thing I always try is shut everything down and reboot computer. Often works :)

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  3. It's lovely to look back on summer walks and an interesting piece of history too.

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    1. Thanks Eileen, it is also lovely to get a few more pictures out of the backlog!

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  4. Looks wonderfully deserted for a good look around, but the land erosion must be an enormous concern
    for everyone directly affected. How did Daisy recover?

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    1. Cheers Chris, the big concern with erosion is that the road will go at some point. It's an important local road and massive amounts have been spent in recent years stabilising the most vulnerable point.

      Have a look at the final photo on this post https://theviewfrombagend.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/windswept-allonby.html

      That's the point where hundreds of tons of concrete have been poured to make a new sea wall . . . time will tell if it is up to the task.

      Daisy not too tired, thanks.

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    2. Chris, if you're interested, go to Google and search for "Dubmill Point Cumbria". Click on 'images', some of the photos clearly show how vulnerable the road is (and how much concrete has been put in recently!)

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