Friday, 16 December 2016

Sneaky little b*st*rds - or a cautionary tale for anyone else who used to use Fast.co.uk (edit: or Firenet)

When our internet provider went bust on Tuesday 13th and cut off our broadband services, one of the first things I did was telephone the bank and have them stop all future payments to "Internet Services" - the trading name used for our debits over the last 9 years or so we had been with the company.    The next payment was due on Thursday 15th and as we paid in advance each month I felt quite within my rights to stop any further money going out to a company who were not longer providing me with the service they had contracted to supply.

I was, therefore, less than pleased when I logged onto internet banking this morning to do something completely unrelated, and saw that on Wednesday 14th, a debit had been made for the usual monthly amount by a company called Firenet.  Fortunately I knew that was another trading name used by Fast.co.uk.

Thankfully, a few minutes on the phone to our bank has put a block on that little game, and refunded the money.

If they can try this on us then there will be THOUSANDS of other customers who have had money debited for a service that will never, ever materialise.

Should you have any friends with an email address from Firenet or "gofast.co.uk" please get them to check their bank account . . . 



10 comments:

  1. Can I share this on Facebook and Twitter?

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    1. Please do, and many thanks for asking first :)

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  2. Replies
    1. Absolutely Dani.
      How many ways is this SO wrong?
      ~ the company had already gone bust and ceased providing a service,
      ~the debit was taken by a different trading name,
      ~the debit was taken a day earlier than the contracted date . . .

      Very glad that banks in this country can be trusted to refund the money and put a block on further attempts to (this is a nasty word but I am going to say it anyway) commit fraud.

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  3. That's dreadful. Good job you noticed it quickly. X

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    1. Thanks Jules. Behaviour like this does leave a nasty taste, doesn't it?

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  4. How fraudulent. Glad you are with a good bank, and yes most are pretty honest and get down to the nitty-gritty of fixing things quickly. Of course this is coming from an "old" bank girl (giggle). Hope all is tracking well to get you back up & running, but I'll not be able to ring you for Xmas(bummer). Have a good weekend and take care.

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    1. Susan, we should get our broadband re-connected 'properly' between Christmas and the New Year, in the meantime we have these mobile dangles which mean we can browse the web, do email and so on. Unfortunately my phone package which included calls to Oz is also casualty of all this change, so you and I will have to Facetime/Skype in future when it's my turn to call :)

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  5. How on earth can that be legal? Oh that makes me cross! And how many people would even expect such an underhand move, so they'll probably get away with it, for a while.

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    1. Mereth, it is not legal, but many people (apparently) don't check their bank accounts very often so companies with less than honorable intentions will try it on. We are not the only ones who have been charged like this; on an IT website where this is being discussed, some people have found that five times the normal monthly payment has been taken. Our bank hadn't processed a refund last time I looked, heaven help the poor customer service person who answers my call on Monday if it's not done by then!

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