Sunday, 23 October 2016

Rollercoaster week

Bit of a rollercoaster at Bag End since the last post, plenty of wonderful "ups" and a couple of crashing "downs".  The first down came last Thursday when Danny's daughter phoned to tell me he had passed away during the night.  Not unexpected because we knew when he moved that he had cancer (and at 91, you're not going to recover from that) but it was still very upsetting.   She asked me to let many of his friends know, so I seemed to spend much of the next two days talking to neighbours, which in and of itself is not a bad thing . . .


Until Management retires we are at the mercy of his business diary, and so it was that whilst I was finishing getting the caravan ready, he was in Suffolk.  This meant an early solo start on Saturday and an 80-mile tow to Scotch Corner where M. was already waiting, standing on the corner to guide me into the caravan parking area, bless him:)    Our couple of hours at Ropers saying goodbye to the Lunar and collecting Rosie the Rimini (?) were a blur of activity and sadly the only photo I remembered to take was this one:



Daisy was quite brilliant and took all the upheaval very, very well.



Not surprisingly, Sunday was a blob of exhaustion and inactivity, but the next couple of days were great fun as we started to fill up Rosie with all our bits and bobs.  Not quite so much fun was keeping an eye on the weight.  Non-caravany people might think you can bung pretty much anything in a new van until the cupboards are full, but if you're being careful nothing could be further from the truth.  Caravans do not have big payloads, ours is 'officially' 163kg although there is stuff you can do to gain a few kg (such as changing the gas bottle for a 'Lite' version).  That might sound a lot but essentials such as the motor mover and a leisure battery weight 32kg and 25kg respectively.  User payload immediately down to 106kg.  Other items like water carriers, awning, chairs add more weight, and so it goes on until you suddenly find you're run out of payload.



We've been fairly ruthless about what does and does not need to go back into the caravan, what travels in the car, and the spreadsheet has been refined and tuned and refined again and again - interesting exercise.  I thought we had loading under control with the Lunar and I had the chassis re-plated to give me extra wiggle room, but that's not possible with the new caravan.





Madam is not always a willing model:) !



Wednesday and Thursday were full of compost, horticultural grit and tulip bulbs . . . 300 bulbs to be precise.  Unfortunately there are still a lot more to be taken care of.  Sadly bulb planting is not particularly photogenic - nor is putting the biggest, fattest garlic cloves from this year's harvest in the ground :)









Friday was eclipsed by the funeral.  Hated it but had to go.  Management could not attend because of a meeting.  Saturday = collapse, veg out, walk Daisy, read Kindle, do very little else.







12 comments:

  1. Ah, now you have a "Rosie" too 'cept yours is for summer and mine is for winter 😀

    Bulb planting is tedious, isn't it - but so worth it... eventually 😂

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    1. Oh Dani, I'm so glad not to be the only one who finds bulb planting very tedious (and it serves me right for doing it in this quantity!) I thinks it makes gardeners eternal optimists - buy lovely bulbs, then bury them under the soil in the hope/expectation they'll come up the following year.

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  2. Bulbs don't do it for me. Think its coz I'm not English and find they are all a bit of a faff, after planting (at a specific depth/specific way round) I then find I keep digging them up accidently, then once finished flowering they hang around getting more and more straggly while you wait for them to die off!! Sorry Jayne! :) PS have fun playing out with Rosie :) x

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    1. It's OK Hawthorn, I completely 'get' what you say about bulbs. For years I didn't use any except a few daffodils for exactly the same reasons, especially the hanging around waiting for the leaves to die back. I'm "hoping" that having them in tubs means I can put them where I can see them when in flower, and when they get to the ugly stage I can bung the pots out of sight somewhere!

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  3. So sorry to hear about Dannny. I often think about his house & what I'd have done to it and the garden. He must have been very nice. Ooh, I love bulbs, though I don't have lots, but enough to enjoy waiting to see them flower. I've a lovely aqua ixia, just flowering for the 2nd times since I had it. Last year I go 2 stems of flowers, but this year I have more than 12. Exciting. I'll do a post about the garden soooon! Hopefully........... Enjoy the new van. We don't really have to worry too much about the weight issue, as ours are so different to the UK ones. We hope to use ours again soon, but have a busy week coming up now. Take care.

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    1. Thanks Susan, I still chuckle about our 'wild half hour' when we fantasised about you buying the house :)

      Enjoy your Ixia - I have 100 of them still in cold store waiting to be planted! It will be a challenge to grow them here, apparently the bulbs like to be dry over winter . . .

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  4. I'm sorry to read about Danny. He reached a good age but it's still very upsetting. I love your third photograph of Daisy. It's just the same when I try and take a picture of Lily, although, I suspect Daisy is better behaved. X

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    1. Thanks Jules. I suspect all dog owners have more than a few pictures like that :)

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  5. I'm sorry about Danny. You've had quite the week.

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    1. Thanks Sadie. Going on holiday immediately afterwards certainly helped.

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