Tuesday, 4 October 2016

Lovely day

As Tuesdays go, this one has been rather lovely :)   Any morning which starts with a sunrise like this is going to be a good one.



Thanks to Kate's recommendation, we have found a lovely carpenter in Alan, who turned up first thing and managed to be completely unfazed during the day by the rather "fluid" way in which things are designed and created at Bag End.





Built completely 'on the fly' and made up entirely from recycled and scavenged timber, Alan is well on the way to making a solid frame that we are going to cover with net.  He's easy to work with and the conversations durng the day were interesting and varied, the most unusual being different ways to compost human poo!

These last pictures were taken late and aren't the best:





It cannot have been too stressful - I have just received a text to confirm he will be back at 8.30 tomorrow to finish up!

I toyed with the possibility of putting a polytunnel over these beds but it was one of those ideas which never sat well, and I knew deep down that it would not work.  Apart from winding up Mr Clutter it would look a bit too 'allotment' and we didn't think it would sit well with what we've created in this part of the garden.  Whilst I want to provide shelter and protection for food crops, polytunnels can get ludicrously hot in summer, will probably be just as cold as the outside in winter, and I'll need to water the beds all year.  With net we'll get some protection from wind, (hopefully) a little filtering of rain, and covered in green mesh fingers are crossed it will look OK!






10 comments:

  1. I've been tempted to do something similar. Anything to keep the pests out. At least you are working on flat ground!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jessica, certainly in your garden it would work well to exclude dear, rabbits, Ptolomey and all their chums. We are definitely not on flat ground though - there is an 8" drop between the beds - look closely and you'll see one side is two boards high, the other is three. A purchased tunnel would have had to be custom made to deal with that.

      Delete
  2. I think you are right in that polytunnels are more allotment than garden.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sue, with the house sitting right in the middle of this garden, there's no where I could really "tuck a polytunnel in a corner".

      Delete
  3. That is a mighty frame - looks good. Would probably look less intrusive than a polytunnel and be less hot too x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cheers Hawthorn, it's looking even more 'mighty' now - there is far more timber in the finished frame than I envisaged, but Alan and Max are keen it doesn't blow down in winter . . .

      Delete
  4. Fantastic sunrise photo!! Also delighted that your domestic staff are both multiplying & being kept busy- "fluid" working practices rule!. Speak soon? xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You really are a terribly silly boy, but I've known you too long not to love you {{chuckle}} !!!! Good chat this afternoon, thank you :)

      Delete
  5. That looks like an epic structure. The garden looks gorgeous. I'm going to go backwards through this blog for a bit. I do like your copyright disclosure ... I might blatantly nick it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh Rachel, that's so funny . . . but nick away, although I suspect my Copyright Karma would have no affect whatsoever on someone who wants to help themselves to something!!

      Hope you enjoy going backwards, and it takes your mind of worrying about HG.

      Delete

So there I am, chuntering on to myself, but it would be lovely to hear from you. Thanks to all who take the time to comment - it makes my day :)

and I always delete spam - my blog, my rules :-}