Wednesday, 20 April 2016

All over the place

My blogging is a bit like my brain at present - all over the place.  Towards the end of last year I was getting a bit fed up with my own blog posts {?!}, the ones which seemed like an endless litany of "did this, did that, did some more".  I thought it might be nicer to wait until projects were completed and then publish a complete 'start to finish' instead.

That's really not working . . .

I'm now in a place where the "New Pictures" folder has far more images in it than I like and the catching up task feels like one of those huge, too big jobs again.  So we're going back to the "litany of lists".  My blog, my rules, bla bla bla.  What the heck, this was and still is MY journal and being a sad git I get a huge amount of pleasure on tired, cold, dark evenings when I look back and see what we've done in previous months/years.  According to Google, over 1.3 million blog posts are published every day so if mine get boring there are plenty more out there!


I am continuing with the "30 minute rule" and that, combined with being surprisingly disciplined and doing the exercises my physiotherapist prescribed means that for the first time in four or five years I have periods where my shoulders are not painful.  Baby steps and we're not healed yet but it is very encouraging.

Yesterday was quite beautiful and as Daisy had enjoyed a longer walk at Crummock on Monday, she got four small trips around the block and plenty of games in the garden.  It felt like I spent the entire day outside, something that really hasn't happened enough the last few months. I concentrated on the New Garden, an area which became sadly out of control over the winter.  Any organic credentials I might have aspired to are now completed trashed - I have fenced off the worst areas to keep Daisy away and applied a liberal dose of glyphosate to the grass which has sprung up.  Along with wild strawberry, grass is a weed in it's own right at Bag End :-{





In a less feral part of the garden I continued to work in the fruit cage clearing out the old Marshmello plants.  This stock originally came from my friend Kath and should have been replaced last year but that never happened.  I bought new stock from Ken Muir and have overwintered them in a vegetable bed, the new plants are looking great and hopefully it will not be long before I move them.







The remaining Lonicera nitida was planted around the New Garden beds but I'm going to need a great deal more to complete the whole area . . .



In a high-falutin' attempt at succession planting, I have stocked up this little triangular bed next to the path.  For an early show there are lots of Snakeshead Fritillary, to follow on I've added Thalictrum aquilegiifolium 'Thundercloud', and a Verbena bonariensis in the middle should add some late height and flowers.  Thalictrum are part of the Ranunculaceae family so it amuses me to have put Ranunculus 'Aviv Rose' around the edge of the raised bed which, eventually, will house a climber to cover the chimney. If the not-box Lonicera grows into a neat hedge it might look rather smart . . . Of course, if Daisy continues to tramp all over it then nothing will look smart at all, so more temporary netting until the plants are established.





In the 'I'll blog it when it's finished' pile has been a lot of progress at the back of the vegetable patch including this lovely trellis (a.k.a. builders' weld-mesh).  Clematis montana rubens should be happy here and the early flowers will bring pollinators.



The final task just before dusk was to take more glyphosate to the area the other side of our Side Garden fence.  The wide tarmac area is used by the adjacent church for parking but we have finally realised that we actually own the bank underneath our fence . . . that would be the bank that is covered in weeds which I have had LP strim on a couple of occasions.  I've made the decision that I am going to actively 'garden' this bit and over time want to plant it up with robust perennials that will look a whole lot better than the couch grass, nettles and Good King Henry which currently abound.  Last year I planted some Ox Eye Daisy which did really well, it is likely to become a resting place for all the surplus geranium, euphorbia and dog rose that are growing out of control in the garden!!










11 comments:

  1. I hope your Lonicera are growing. MIne are biding their time, but then they were ancient specimens to start with and it has been quite chilly up until the last few days.

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    1. Thanks Jessica. I was delighted yesterday to see new leaves on many of the plants, fingers crossed yours settle down soon.

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  2. You have been busy lately. It's such a big garden and I suppose some areas will always get a bit wayward (like children really) and others behave nicely. Noticed the young lady in so many phots checking on your progress. Here in Oz, oxeye daisy is positively invasive everywhere. You even see whole paddocks covered in yellow/black flowers at certain times of the year. Happy gardening and take care.

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    1. Hi Susan. My "problem" is that I am still making the garden, at the same time as trying to maintain what has already been created. Once "all" I have to do is look after what we've got it will feel like a part-time job!

      Little Miss Perfect is never too far away when I am working outside (although she got too hot in the sun this morning and took herself inside to cool down). Ox Eye Daisy spreads here too :-}

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    2. That was quick and we must have been on our computers at the same time, although I'm eating breakfast and checking emails and blogs on my old laptop. I did a quick dash outside to shoo literally, about a hundred corellas out of the side garden around the bird feeder. They are very destructive and I've a new lemon tree in there. Nighty night.

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  3. We have a lonicera hedge along the pathway into the garden, it took a little while to get established but now it is a thick and verdant little hedge. Visually it is worth the effort.

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    1. Hawthorn, thanks for this and sorry it has taken me a week to reply :{
      Really appreciate the confirmation that lonicera will work up here. I find most shrubs take a good year to get established but after that they grow away quite well.

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  4. As you say your blog your ruled - quite right. I was crawling around tidying up under our red currants in out 'cage' yesterday.

    I love dog daisies - they make good cut flowers too.

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    1. Sue, thanks for this and sorry it has taken me a week to reply :{ Now I have seen your own blog I understand the 'crawling around in the redcurrants' reference!

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  5. Never boring Jayne ,,, I love your enthusiasm and seeing your garden grow. Out at some point every day at the moment trying to keep on top of the weeds here. Can't believe how fast everything is growing despite the bitter cold ,,, hopefully it's warming up this week so I expect things will be growing even faster! I just hope everything has survived the late frosts.

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    1. Enthusiasm? Don't know about that - bloody minded, more like! I agree with you about the cold but the weeds are still managing to romp away.

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So there I am, chuntering on to myself, but it would be lovely to hear from you. Thanks to all who take the time to comment - it makes my day :)

and I always delete spam - my blog, my rules :-}