Sunday, 6 December 2015

Appropriate adjective?

Shock
Disbelief
Sadness
Fear

I cannot sum up how I feel this morning.  The flooding in 2009 was horrendous but with the eventual building of additional river defences, and the clearing of some rivers, we felt that West Cumbria had moved on.  And now this happens.

Although the flood water in Cockermouth is not as deep as six years ago it feels like the damage is more extensive, and covers a much wider area.  And the fear expressed by everyone I have seen this morning whilst out with Daisy is "how many more times is this going to happen?"



Whilst we have no direct water damage at Bag End (excluding the garages which were already leaking) we are still affected.  I don't need some damn stupid Small Business Saturday to tell me to support our local traders -  I shopped in Cockermouth twice last week.  But once the mud dries and the insurance companies finish dragging their feet, how many of the small shops in Main Street will stay closed?  I'm proud to eat meat when I know where it grazed - but will Tony Harrison and others like him open again?  How often can you kick local people who already struggle to make a living before they say "enough"?

We are affected emotionally if not physically, and we are not alone.  I saw a neighbour this morning whose daughter has just bought her first house in Cockermouth.  Fortunately she had not moved in.  Unfortunately they finished the new kitchen and decorating this week.  They cannot get to the house at present, but they can see it from a distance and the water level is above the ground floor windowsills.  It's not nice to see a big, six foot tall neighbour in tears.

Some of the stones which washed out of the farm lonning on Thursday night:


This is about a mile away; on Thursday night the water was over the bridge parapet on the left:




There is some outstanding footage at Vimeo from Adamedia Ltd, it's far better than anything I have seen on Sky or the BBC.  It is also heartbreaking - I know every location in every part of the film.






15 comments:

  1. Ah, that is so sad. We watched the footage on Sky last night, and my heart went out to all those affected. The power of water is not acknowledged until there is a flood of this magnitude. That and wild fires. Both freak me out.

    Sky showed the waterfalls streaming off the hills (fens?) turning brooks into raging rivers - scary stuff. Has that water reached the towns / villages yet?

    Stay safe, dry and warm.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Dani. Whenever anyone underestimates the power of water I tend to sarcastically ask "oh, have you not seen the Grand Canyon)" Thankfully wildfires are not something we have to contend with in England.

      Didn't know you could access our Sky channels, they have not done a bad job of coverage today. Up here we call the hills "fells". It generally takes 24/36 hours for rainwater to drain down to the rivers and towns.

      Delete
  2. In the field opposit our house is a normally small stream, this morning one of our neighbours apparently went to clear debris to allow the water under the bridge, he fell in and my husband other neighbors and emergency services have been trying all day to recover him from under the bridge. What a bloody day it's been.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh Ann, that sounds tragic. You use the word 'recover' rather than rescue . . . what a bloody day indeed.

      Delete
  3. I was thinking of you when I saw the TV coverage but hoped you were high enough ti escape - I'm glad that I was correct,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your concern Sue. We are at 150' above sea level and about 100' above the normal river level.

      When we moved up in 2007, the floods two years earlier were still a recent memory and we considered flood risk as one of the factors when looking at houses. Who knew how important that was going to become?

      Delete
  4. Oh Jayne, it all sounds so awful, but we've not seen anything on our TV news over here, but then all we seem to get these days is things about terrorism, which is getting on my nerves. Other important stories seem to be overlooked. I've just put on BBC world news and that doesn't seem to have anything either. I'll pop on my big computer later and have a look at that website you put on. We do have extremes here with both flood, fire and severe drought. I do hope that it doesn't get any worse for Cumbria. Take care.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susan, why would Australian TV show news about what is, in relation to your own country, a small bit of local damage the other side of the world? We rarely get news about your country :-}

      I doubt that you can access Sky news 'cos of country restrictions but you could try news.sky.com You could look at Twitter with hash-tag Cumbriafloods. We were getting a lot of our information from that last night.

      It has got very cold now, and more rain is forecast for later in the week. Don't get yourself upset worrying about us, but thank you for caring :-}

      Delete
    2. We did actually get a short bit on one of the local news tonight, but we used to get much more, because you must remember that many years ago(when I was a child), most people here had an English heritage. My paternal grandmother came from Manchester. Thanks for the updates. Take care.

      Delete
  5. We ourselves have luckily not been affected but our friends and neighbours and farmers I see at work all have tales of people who are suffering or indeed themselves who are suffering. I drove over to York on Sunday and there are fields that are now lakes with the livestock perched on any available high ground. Sending you love and hope xx

    ReplyDelete
  6. We ourselves have luckily not been affected but our friends and neighbours and farmers I see at work all have tales of people who are suffering or indeed themselves who are suffering. I drove over to York on Sunday and there are fields that are now lakes with the livestock perched on any available high ground. Sending you love and hope xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Hawthorn, I guess we will never know just how much livestock was lost. Hope your exam went well :-)

      Delete
  7. Viewed the vid. All I can say is oh my God. What a disaster. All those storms one after another. Hope you get a chance to help. Take care.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Kris, you've summed it up completely - a disaster. And we are due more rain. It is actually quite bright right this minute, but the rain is due to start again this evening and continue for another few days.

      Delete

So there I am, chuntering on to myself, but it would be lovely to hear from you. Thanks to all who take the time to comment - it makes my day :)

and I always delete spam - my blog, my rules :-}