Tuesday, 10 November 2015

Down the rabbit hole . . .

I have been taking photographs since I was about ten years old and my first camera was a Kodak Brownie 44a. I used to take rolls of 127 film (and all my pocket money) to the village chemist every couple of weeks, and wait for a packet of photos to come back about ten days later.  I still remember the magic and excitement of waiting to see my pictures, even if shots were out of focus or badly composed.

The sixties were just winding down but if the tabloid papers were to be believed it was still an era of sex, drugs and rock'n'roll with photographers such as David Bailey and Terry Donovan often making more headlines than their subjects.  The chances, therefore, of my being allowed to pursue a career in this field were nil to zero; such debauchery and scandal was not to be tolerated within many hundred paces of the family home.  However I never stopped taking pictures, with varying degrees of enthusiasm which waxed and waned over the years.

I am not a brilliant photographer, nor will I ever be, because I don't dedicate enough time to it and never has that been as true as in the last year or two. But recently I had an unexpected opportunity to spend half a day with a professional photographer, someone who has worked at the very highest level for decades.  I got to watch him work and perhaps more importantly, to chat about what he was doing and he was incredibly generous with his time and the information he shared.  I confess I went into the experience with nothing more than intellectual curiosity,  I reckoned it would be an interesting day, and not a lot more.  What I didn't expect was to come out of the meeting completely re-energised about not just taking pictures, but taking GOOD pictures.  It has also been the incentive, the motivational kick-up-the-bum, the impetus I need to deal with the dreaded "to be sorted for blog" folder.


With much support and encouragement from Management I have finally bitten a bullet I should have got my teeth into many years ago, set the camera to shoot RAW, ordered Lightroom and spent many hours watching tutorials on Youtube. 

And now we are off down the rabbit hole . . .  thankfully there are only 1,500 or so files in the backlog now that I have decided to ignore all those from the Trailcam, and with a couple of days graft I might just get there.

I have always been quite "anti" digital post-processing, the Luddite in me believing that it was better to get the shot in camera, rather than create it on the computer.  This fern has nothing to do with any pending blog post, but it is interesting what you can turn an image into with absolutely no training in Lightroom and very little idea what you're doing!











7 comments:

  1. We use Lightroom and see it as an alternative to twiddling with settings on the camera. Often we need to take photos quickly with no time to consider,shutter speed an apertures. Then auto doesn't always cut it.

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    1. I think a lot of people use LR in this way Sue. But first I need to catalogue and keyword thousands of image files . . .

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    2. I did all that and then when I upgraded to Windows 10 it missed the whole lot up and so far I haven't motivated myself to redo it

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    3. Oh, I feel the pain . . . and the LR catalog backup won't reinstall?

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    4. It sort of did but messed up the hierarchy that I had created

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  2. I can see you being very busy over the coming weeks. Sounds like too much technology for me. I got a Box Brownie when I was about 11 or 12 and have some sort of camera ever since. Enjoy and take care.

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    1. Thanks Susan. Yes, definitely busy, but in a nice way :-)

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So there I am, chuntering on to myself, but it would be lovely to hear from you. Thanks to all who take the time to comment - it makes my day :)

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