Monday, 20 October 2014

Before the storm

Around the world of gardening blogs people have been 'watching a tree' this year.  We've been watching a tree of our own just not writing about it.

We have been keeping a close eye on a large Rowan next to the top pond, and it's not been good.  Late Spring the tree came into leaf but it was looking particularly peely-wally.  Mid summer the few leaves it had fell off.  Whilst the leaf drop could have been attributed to the long, dry summer, no other trees in the garden were similarly affected, and (thankfully) no other trees have displayed large cracks and peeling bark.  As the weeks went on I've noticed die back on the top branches of the tree, and recently very obviously dead bits have snapped off in the wind.

Cutting out the worst affected branches has been on the list of jobs to eventually get to, but with the tail end of a hurricane due tomorrow and an available LP,  this morning was dedicated to some severe tree surgery.









Very pleased that in four hours (which was all the time we got before the weather decided we should pack up) we cut out the crown of the tree, shredded all the thin stuff, and packed the larger sections under cover in the huge log pile.  Sad to find that there was much more dead wood than we'd hoped.





What is left will either regrow next Spring and if we get loads of water shoots I will just cut out a proportion of them, OR, I finally have a trunk over which I can grow a rambler rose like Paul's Himalayan Musk which has been on the "Plants Wanted" list for a very long time. 





Unless we're talking leylandii, taking down a tree is never a good thing . . . but we have at least another half dozen Rowan in the garden and they'll all get a bucket of home-brewed compost as an autumn treat when I do the pre-winter tidying up :}



8 comments:

  1. Shame about the tree, but I suppose that some them have their own life span and growing a rose over the stump sounds so pretty. Hope the storm doesn't do too much damage, as Lucie from The Happy Quilter was also talking about it.
    Does Daisy take fright in stormy weather? Bunker down and take care.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Susan, sad to lose a tree so looking at the positive side which is having a 'rose support' instead.

      Daisy is not bothered by thunder and lightning (thankfully, because it drove Ollie nuts) but she hates the noise of wind and rain and will come out of her bed in the middle of the night and want to curl up near me. She reminds us of a little kid climbing out of bed in the dark 'cos they're scared :} Not surprised she did it last night when it was windy and noisy.

      Delete
  2. One of our crab apples has had a severe chopping - though not as severe as your rowan, We are hoping for rejuvenation

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sue, fingers crossed your tree survives, crab apples are so lovely

      Delete
  3. My Joseph Rock has looked a little sickly this year and lost its leaves early although it is still covered in berries. I have noticed damage on some of the higher branches but I think it's caused by woodpeckers! Windy and showery here but lovely sunshine between the showers lighting up the colours in the garden. Take care in the stormy weather x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hope it recovers Jill, I know how much you love your 'Joseph Rock'.
      Weather is similar here, so far nothing like as bad as was forecast.

      Delete
  4. I hate having to remove trees too but it's becoming a necessity here. The woodland has been neglected for so long it's got to the point where everything is crowding each other out and all the trees are suffering. I'm hoping that by selectively thinning I can improve the chances of those that remain. We'll have to take out some that are too close to the house as well.
    Glad the storm was not as bad as expected, damp squib here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're doing absolutely the right thing by selective thinning and the remaining trees will be so much better for it. When we removed the leylandii we discovered poor, misshapen, light-starved trees that no-one knew were there - and (this rowan excepted!) they are all growing much better now they have light and air and space to spread out.

      Delete

So there I am, chuntering on to myself, but it would be lovely to hear from you. Thanks to all who take the time to comment - it makes my day :)

and I always delete spam - my blog, my rules :-}