Wednesday, 26 June 2013

The dark side of buttercups

Daisy has been under the weather for a couple of days, nothing specific I could put my finger on but not herself - quieter than usual, a bit off her food.  The only physical symptom I could see was her tummy, the skin a bit red & angry and felt very hot to the touch.

The only thing which had changed in 'Daisy World' over the last week or so is the grass.  Full of buttercups and daisies, I left it long and although we were rewarded with dozens of bees coming to feed every day I had a hunch that this was what was causing the problem.  Madam has been playing on the Cottage Garden lawn a great deal recently and a conversation with a friend followed up with a bit of Googling confirmed the culprit.

Buttercups contain a compound called protoanemonin, a powerful irritant, which can cause inflammation or ulceration of the mouth in horses.  According to the Dogs Trust buttercups can cause dermatitis (and horrible digestive problems if eaten).  They have a list of poisonous substances which can be downloaded here.





So all the grass is cut, the flowers are gone and we'll see if she perks up.  Much to Daisy's disgust I am wiping her tummy with a very dilute solution of Thieves every time she comes in and all her bedding has been washed; whilst I explained this is the price she pays for being a pampered pet and is preferable to Life On The Streets she does not seem convinced.

8 comments:

  1. Poor Daisy, I hope she feels better soon. Dermatitis is painful and is why I wash most of my fabric when I get it home. The sizing gives me dermatitis, which ends up in dry, split hands. Give her a big hug from me.

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    1. Thanks Susan, I will pass your on hug when Daisy finally hauls herself out of her bed! She's not one for leaping up as soon as the alarm goes, bit like me really :}

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  2. Oh no. I do hope she is better soon. They can be such a worry.

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    1. Morning Jessica, hopefully we caught this before it really messed her skin up. Who knew that a flowery lawn could cause such problems :{

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  3. I'm sure that Daisy will perk up v soon. :) They are a worry!

    'Preferable to life on the streets' indeed - I tell this to Cindy every time mum gets me to put the Stronghold capsule on the back of her neck. (Note: mum gets me to do this such that I will be the Villain of the Piece, and not her!)

    On an unrelated note, can you take a pic and do a show and tell of that wonderful border adj. small pond to the right?

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    1. 'wonderful border', whose garden you looking at missus? Yes, of course I will, as you asked so nicely.

      In return, could I ask you to do some Google searches about the Selamectin, active ingredient in Stronghold?

      It's not as bad as Frontline (which I found horrendous stuff) and I stopped using it on Ollie many years ago when I learnt a bit about it. His overall health improved remarkably once I ceased. Even with his huge coat we did not have a problem with fleas. As for ticks, it didn't stop them biting the dog, just killed them once they had latched on by which time it's too late to stop the chances of Lyme disease transmission.

      Daisy gets a regular wipe over with Thieves and her all bedding is washed very regularly.

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    2. Will do - btw, what's Thieves?

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    3. Thieves is a blend of five essential oils. If you Google 'Four Thieves Oil' you will find countless results about the myth of it protecting some unsavoury types from The Plague. I use it for just about everything - cleaning, in laundry, air freshener, in the first aid kit.

      In 2008 Weber State Uni (Utah) tested anti-microbial properties of 91 pure oils and 64 blends and the results are v. interesting in light of the increasing number antibiotic resistant infections (bear in mind this study was funded by Youngs, an essential oil supplier). I'm considering adapting the widely accepted Thieves blend to include oils who scored even higher on 'zone of MRSA inhibition'.

      Here's a couple of links, you'll find loads more.

      http://www.natural-aromatherapy-benefits.com/thievesoilrecipe.html
      www.youngliving.com/export/sites/youngliving/en_US/pdfs/MRSA_article.pdf

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