Sunday, 31 October 2010

Honey Fungus?

This is the long bed at the front of the house which I filled with daffodils last year.



And this is some of the fungus currently growing at the base of the escallonia.







We've got this on 14 plants, about 25% of the total planting. If it is Honey Fungus then bugger, but I won't be surprised if that's what this turns out to be. HF is thought to attack old and diseased wood and that is certainly a reasonable description of the escallonia mess. I console myself with the knowledge whilst it is almost impossible to eradicate completely, it can be kept partially in check by physical barriers. If I have to have this anywhere in the garden, the front bed is the best place for it.

From the RHS website:



We're fairly certain we have seen timber like this when clearing (and thankfully burning) bits of this hedge in the past. Bugger, bugger, bugger.




When I have the time, the inclination, and the weather is co-operative I will do some digging and see if I can find any of the rhizomorphs. At some point in the very far off future we always planned to remove the escallonia . . . might be doing it sooner than expected.

8 comments:

  1. Mushroom management from down south says from the photo they are definitley honey fingus. He knows his fungi and even got the book out to be sure. Armillaria mellea is the proper jobby name. Apparently edible whne young so the baby ones can bee cooked! Not the greatest gourmet experience but won't poison you!!

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  2. Thanks Mrs Sarum, I was going to write to you directly and ask if your Management would take a look (I remember this being one of his specialist subjects). Tell the dear chap I appreciate his opinion, even if it is not what I wanted to hear!

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  3. My firsst thought was "oh nooo". Even as a nongardener I know you do not want that in your garden. My second thought was that it could be worse since you had said that the escallonia was going at some point. So I guess what I'm saying is that it could have been worse.

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  4. You're right Sue, it is not good but it could be worse - it could be along the back fence where we have trees we want to keep (pray it isn't there, as yet unnoticed). Of course, with the benefit of hindsight I should have spotted it before - but in my defence I have been a tad busy with other things!

    Never mind, we have a plan, will just add it to The List :{

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  5. I have it in the cutting flower bed where old stumps were removed. This is divided from the rest of the garden by the front drive so I don't know if it will spread. Mainly affects trees I think, of which we have few.

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  6. Thasnk VH, glad yours is confined. Given how many tree stumps we have still in the ground - shudder - not going to think about that despite what I said to Sue.

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  7. Bilbo, sorry to hear about the fungus. Not a fun thing, even if affecting things you intend to get rid of one day.

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