Sunday, 17 May 2009

Fences

This is definitely Hazel's fault, but Ange can share some of the blame if she likes.

Fence painting didn't happen today, I got sidetracked into mowing all the grass and by the time I had finished it was nearly 3.00 and I needed food, a bath, and a lie-down - in that order! Once recovered, I read Hazel's comment about having 72 feet of fence to paint.

Oh dear - if only. 72 is the measurement from the corner of the low fence (where it meets the higher fencing around the Coppice) back up towards the shrubbery behind the house. Like a fool thing, I went out with a very long surveyors tape and, for the first time, measured the fences at the back of our house.

The low fence, some of which was protected last month, measures 155 feet (that's jut over 47m for the youngsters). I have done 115' of one side - that means there is about 200' still to do.

Two sides of the tall fence around the Coppice are 76 feet - that's 152' to be painted at 5' high. A total of 350' of timber to creosote and THAT is not counting the 4th side of the Coppice (one side is wall) plus the very long fence which runs between us and the lane. No way I am going back out to measure that because there is no way it will get attended to this side of the Summer.

Hazel - yes, painting can get a bit Zen-like, with this much to do it needs to!

No girls, I am not going to spray - it is rarely windless enough here for that to be an option and as creosote is such horrible stuff I don't want to be breathing it in or having it drift onto the few plants we do have at Bag End.

I think I'm going to have another lie-down . . .

7 comments:

  1. Ah - now that IS a lot to creosote...although on the bright side, you've already done about a quarter, if I read your post correctly.

    I can quite understand that you don't want to use a spray - maybe there is a roller/brush with a reservoir so you don't have to keep dipping in the pot? Or have I made that up?

    Well, at least you can do log shifting when you get fed up with fence painting...

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  2. Thanks Hazel, I'm ignoring the Coppice fence for now and therefore have done one-third of the back fence! Sounds better than a quarter {giggle}.

    Chunky brush dipped into small bucket actually works quite well.

    As for log-shifting when I get bored, hmm, young lady, I think you need a holiday in Cumbria - a WORKING holiday, HARD work!

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  3. Good luck with all that fence, lets hope for your sake it's a dry summer. I speak here from expereince having 6ft tall fencing like yours I know how long it can take. Thanks to other commitments we actually eneded up with our fence being two colours for over a year as we couldn't get to one part when it was dry enough to paint.

    Maybe you should organise a fence painting party. something along the line of so much fence equals one bottle of beer might get you some volunteers.

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  4. Angela could be on to something, here - can you work out some sort of tie-in with the Jenning's Brewery, perhaps...?

    PS I read the first line of your second para as 'Face painting didn't happen today...', which I thought might be an interesting hobby to start up...? {grin}

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  5. Angela, good idea in theory - but not sure I want to imagine some of our more intoexicated friends let loose around creosote (and you know it would rain . . . . this is Cumbria, after all).

    Hazel - face painting? You've been at the parsnip wine again, haven't you??

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  6. Don't forget that creosote was banned because it is HIGHLY carcinogenic.

    Take care little hobbit and mind your hairy toes!

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  7. I know how horrible it is Flummery, that is why I don't want to spray (and I'm wearing mask, goggles, protective clothing too). The local ag. supply still happily sell it because it's the only thing which seems to protect timber up here.

    A few years back some EEC grant was available for farmers if they used tannilised timber fence posts. Our local wood supplier says it has been great for business because within ten years, all the posts have rotted and are having to be replaced, however, wood that has been protected with creosote is doing fine. They should know - they put up much of this fencing 18 years ago for a previous owner who had it protected every year. You've seen how much fence we have here - replacing it would be unaffordable. Hopefully I can keep it going until hedges are big/thick/strong enough to take over.

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